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#17909 - 02/22/04 12:47 AM Hygiene and Cleaning
Anonymous
Unregistered


How often do you consider hygiene? Hygiene is essential for preventing bacterial and viral infections. Good hygiene always begins with washing your hands. Your hands contain germs and bacteria that you have accumulated through the air and by contacting surfaces. Wash your hands before entering your glider room, after handling a colony, before entering another area where animals are cared for, and after you have handled any animal.

Scheduled regular cleanings of cages, food bowls/dishes, nest boxes, toys, and walls and floor with a disinfectant are essential for good hygiene. Here is a list of recommended minimum time between cleanings for certain items.

Cage: 7 days
Food Dish: Daily
Water Bottle: Daily
toys: Daily
Enclosed Wheel: Every other day
Open Wheel: Twice a week
Change bedding: Weekly
Change nesting material: Daily
Wash pouches: (whenever peed in) or Twice a week
Scales: After each use
Walls: Weekly
Floors: Swept daily, moped twice a week

Keep regular records and record when each was done and you will not forget. Keeping good records is vital. You should record your cleaning times and dates as a part of your daily log.

Along with good hygiene fallows quarantining. If one of the members of a colony is sick the whole colony needs to be places into quarantine for at least 30 after the last symptom was recorded. The quarantine area should be in a separate room, you should change your clothes and shower after handling animals in quarantine. You should clean and sanitize their cage more often possibly even more than daily for certain outbreaks. Depending on the bacteria or virus they should remain in quarantine until 30 days after the longest period of gestation for that virus from the last recorded symptom. Gerardia for example can go unnoticed for many months before reinfecting. This should be considered. Listen to your vet and make sure the animal remains in quarantine for the specified amount of time. The monkey pox outbreak that has cost the lives of many animals and has placed a banned on the trade of several exotics could possibly have been prevented if proper quarantine and hygiene procedures were followed. Please feel free to add any other hygiene procedures I might have left out.

Ushuaia


Edited by sugarlope (11/04/09 02:41 PM)
Edit Reason: changed title

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#17911 - 02/22/04 02:25 AM Re: Hygiene [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


I keep baby wipes in the glider room and wipe my hands with them between cages. While this isn't a disinfecting step, it does help prevent spreading stuff between cages!
As well as keeping the scent from going from cage to cage, saving me from being attacked!
Chey

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#17914 - 02/22/04 07:40 AM Re: Hygiene [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


I totally agree!! Cross contamination is a huge problem and the best way to stop it is by washing your hands. If your in the medical field, as I am, then you would see how big of a problem it really is. If people would just simply wash their hands, they can really reduce risk for lots of illnesses not only in the glider community but for their own health as well. However, I wouldn't be able to find the extra time to log everything I clean, though. Thanks for the guidelines on good hygenie, the importance cant be over stated in my opinion.

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#17916 - 02/22/04 04:09 PM Re: Hygiene [Re: ]
Pockets Offline
Glider Slave

Registered: 01/02/00
Posts: 2092
Loc: Lone Star State
Along the same train of thought here -
Please do not wear your shoes anywhere around your gliders play areas - most people have no idea the chemicals, pathogens, etc found on the soles of their shoes & these are spread throughout their homes.

I never clean everything in my <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/littleglider.gif" alt="" />'s cages in the same day, way to stressful for them.
_________________________
:grey: We will be known forever by the tracks we leave :grey:
http://www.marsupialsociety.org

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#103849 - 05/18/06 09:58 PM The importance of breeder room hygene
Anonymous
Unregistered


Some might not know, but I work for a company that breeds rats and mice for the Pharmaceutical and Research industry. I care for them in a bio level three facility. With this job comes the responsibility of caring for and maintaining the health and well-being of very valuable and sometimes immune-depressed animals. There are various protocols that must be followed to maintain the health status of some very sensitive mice. I cannot go into the specifics of the protocols that I use as that is company information, what I can say is that there are some basic common sense steps that they have taken to ensure the health of their animals. I am telling you this because of what I see as a potential disaster waiting to happen.

There are some breeders on this board large and small that allow random people into their animal room. This is ok if proper steps are taken to ensure that the sugar gliders health is not placed at risk. There are various highly contagious viruses and other infectious agents that can be brought into your animal room either on or in the carrier person. A person can harbor in their lungs or blood any number of viruses that can be passed person to person and person to animal and so on. It has come to my attention that there have been incidents from other breeders breeding a different type of animal in which an infectious agent was carried on the animal that the person purchased from the breeder and they brought it home. As a result a person died. This same agent, which I will not go into to ensure the privacy of individuals has been shown to be carried by sugar gliders. If a similar incident were to happen with sugar gliders this could cost a great deal to the community at large. Sugar glider could be seized and euthanized, and banned from breeding or purchase in the U.S., as did prairie dogs. This is a possible worst case. If things remain the way they are, it will likely happen. That is why I am posting this topic. There are some basic things that can be done to avoid this situation from happening.

1) Limit visitors. You should limit the number of people into and out of your animal room to three. The caretaker, the vet, and the inspector. This is important because the fewer people that enter into and out of the animal room the fewer chances that a person who is harboring a virus will have the opportunity to infect your animals directly. There has been some criticism on this board of other breeders for not allowing people into their animal room. They were actually, intentionally or not, being responsible.

2) Limit carry-in. Not only people but food and other items can carry infectious agents. The vet and the inspector should not carry any food, or anything that is not a necessary part of their job. Rinse all veggies and fruits that are animal food to remove any infectious agents.

3) Limit exposure. The vet and the inspector should be required to cover their shoes, mouth, nose, hair, and hands with proper attire. Dead skin cells and hair are constantly being shed and these can harbor infectious agents. Also your shoes can carry any number of bacteria, viruses, parasites, poisons, ect.. that you might have come into contact with. It is vital that these not be allowed into your breeding room. If you wear a hair net, wash your hands and wear gloves, and sanitize the bottoms of your shoes in a 1:10 bleach solution and use shoe coverings you will greatly limit the possible exposure of your animals. If an inspector or vet will not comply with this then they should not be allowed into you animal room. USDA inspectors MUST respect the health standards of the facility that they inspect.

These are three common sense things that can be done to greatly reduce the risk of viral outbreaks. If you are a breeder you need to consider that if a person dies as a result of your negligence then you can be liable. You could lose everything, your house, your animals for sure, all because of not taking the proper steps to ensure the health and safety of your animals and the public.

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#103850 - 05/18/06 10:24 PM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
SugarBlossoms Offline
Serious Glideritis

Registered: 02/23/06
Posts: 5830
Loc: USA
I would think if something that dangerous is carried by a Sugar Glider, we should know what it is. Every single thing I have read over the years about gliders is that they carry NO diseases and need no immunizations. Also, Prairie dogs are sold all over the U.S.

I agree with keeping ANY area that an animal is in clean. I am concerned about the "scare" of someone dying from a sugar glider. I just don't buy it. JMO

Those three things sound good working in a laboratory, however, it doesn't cut it from home. After all, people have husbands, wives, kids and other animals. Also, the SECOND the glider leaves the breeders home, it just entered the world with all those things you mentioned. Who on earth would possibly know where, what, when or how a glider or person became ill enough to die?

I've had animals of every kind for over 40 years. The ONLY times I've heard of anyone dying from an animal was due to direct attack such as a dog, wolf, bear, etc., not to mention a rabid bat or animal. Mice and rat droppings can kill also.

I would like to know what proof there is that someone died from a direct cause of a Sugar Glider's disease.


Edited by SugarBlossoms (05/18/06 10:30 PM)
_________________________
Keeper of Handprints on my Heart, You left your Footprints on my soul.
My precious loves that left to quickly, Peanut, Katie
Isabella, Kiwi, Bonnie and Monroe.

Spread your wings and glide free of pain,
Until the day I see you again.

God speed my precious angels. I love you. Mama.

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#103852 - 05/18/06 11:11 PM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Dancing Offline
Glideritis Anonymous

Registered: 09/10/04
Posts: 22746
Loc: 80 acres of paradise in KS
Actually...there are diseases that can be shared between sugar gliders and humans. Parasites can be shared as well. Giardia for example. Worse case scenario with human infection of Giardia can result in death especially for babies or those with compromised immune systems.

While I think some of that protocol is excelent advice. I know that Ushuaia means well in offering it.
Some I just don't know if it is practical. In an ideal world yes. But here in MY often hectic world...

Perhaps Schlep will come and post (professional medical input).

I don't think that living in fear of "what if" is the way to live. I do however ask people to wash their hands with antibacterial soap (most of the time) before handling any of my gliders. If someone is sick (cold, flu, etc...) I ask them to come back to visit the gliders when they are healthy again.
_________________________
620-704-9109
Judge not until you have walked in their shoes and lived their lives. What you see online is only part of the story.

I could have missed the pain
But I'd of had to miss the dance


The soul would have no rainbow if the eyes had no tears.

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#103853 - 05/18/06 11:16 PM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Pockets Offline
Glider Slave

Registered: 01/02/00
Posts: 2092
Loc: Lone Star State
I agree with you & respect your research - I have also researched a bit into this area & posted a little in the past - this is a frightening subject & I do not expose my glider's to strangers or take them outdoors much at all.

There are dangers I don't believe others are aware of
_________________________
:grey: We will be known forever by the tracks we leave :grey:
http://www.marsupialsociety.org

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#103854 - 05/18/06 11:30 PM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: Devil_Bunny_Girl]
Anonymous
Unregistered


these diseases you mention are typically not life threatening. These are usually bacterial. Yeah they can be life threatening if not treated such as salmonella. Giardia has rarely caused death. These procedures make since as a big company because you expose these animals to diseases that are deadly to humans. As long as the cages are kept clean this is never going to be a problem. All these things can be passed from animal to human not just sugar gliders. I just haven't heard of a sugar glider disease related death.

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#103855 - 05/19/06 12:00 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: Cloudberry]
sugarlope Offline
Glideritis Anonymous

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 19735
Loc: in my happy place
While I do understand Ushuaia's point(s) that it might limit the problems in a society that is often ready to point fingers at any exotic animal, the truth of the matter is (as several others stated) we don't live in a laboratory. And I would not want to treat my sugar gliders like lab animals, because they are very dear 'pets' just as my dog, cats, etc. are. While they can carry diseases and parasites, many people know the risks with reptiles in the pet trade which have a much greater likelyhood of being carriers of salmonella (and we know there are deaths related to reptile/human transmission) but reptiles are still very much part of the pet trade.

As Teresa said, I am extremely careful that everyone wash their hands before and after handling any of my animals and I do not let people who are ill into see them either. But I would not buy a joey from someone who didn't at least let me see the parents and the set up (made that mistake once, wouldn't do it again). Because I would need to know that I am buying an animal from someone who is taking great care of their animals (and that they are friendly) and doesn't just have them penned up in a 'glider-mill' situation, how else is one supposed to know?
_________________________
~Gretchen
Maia & Squish
If we never loved, then maybe we would never feel pain. Love anyway. It's worth it.

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#103857 - 05/19/06 01:54 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


There is also the logic thatg keeping the babies from being exposed to a natural environment (as opposed to such a sterile environment) can inhibit the growth of natural antibodies and immune systems.

Just look at the native americans and chicken pox.. or was it smallpox? Either way, you get the idea.

As for humans getting sick, if their systems are compromised, then they shouln't TRY being around animals anyhow. Callous, yes, but I am not everyone else's nanny. They wash hands before and after, the rest is their own responsibility.

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#103858 - 05/19/06 05:53 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Judie Offline
Serious Glideritis

Registered: 10/25/01
Posts: 9173
Loc: Edwardsville, Kansas 66113
The child that died was about a year and half ago and the incident was in Oklahoma. He was infected with Samonella as was his Sugar Glider.

While Samonella may only make most of us healthy adults sick.. small children and adults with compromised immune systems are at high risk.

And a good example of how things can go wrong....

I had multi persons in my Glider Room during the the Glider Gathering at my home last month.

One of babies was to be shipped to his new owner... and the owner decided to take their bundle of joy home with them which involved an over night stay as the trip was too lenghty to drive in one day.

Within four days of leaving my home... the baby was not grooming and his fur became tattered looking. Baby was taken to a vet and diagnosed with Clostridium. Then I was contacted. My suggestion was to have the baby seen by a more knowledgeable vet... along with a C&S. This was done on a Thurs. The following Wed... the C&S was positive for Samonella.

Now on my end... the parents of the sick glider along with a sibling appeared to be healthy. I took them to my vet on Wed. Fecal smears and a stain were done on their stools. No Clostridium nor parasites.

Since the clients baby was diagnosed with Samonella I now have the fear my gliders are contaminated as well.

So, I take fecals in of the family of gliders (which were just seen on Tuesday)back to the vet on Thurs and I am requesting Samonella C&S testing.

The agony of thinking fifteen pairs of gliders may be contaminated or may contaminate my family or may have contaminated others who were in my Glider Room was a bit overwhelming to say the very least.

The results came back on my family of gliders last Tuesday. Needless to say... my gliders tested NEGATIVE to Samonella.

The clients baby... was exposed to Samonella while in transit to his new home as he was the only glider that got sick and tested Positive to Samonella. The good news is... he is doing just fine and once his meds are finished... he will be cultered again to be sure he is Samonella free.

So, when having people in one's Glider Room and handeling one's gliders... some safe rules need to be put in place. Next time... I will be sure to montior to be sure people at least wash their hands with an antibacterial soap befor and after handeling my gliders. I also will request no shoes and their feet be covered before entering my room. As to food bring prepared and brought to my home... think we all will just eat out next time.

And last rule... and if one of my Babies cannot get to his new home within one day of driving... then I will insist before hand that baby must be shipped.

I realize unless animals are kept in a sterile lab... one has to be realistic as to germs and bugs. On the other hand... I feel perhaps the above could have been prevented... especially had the baby been shipped.
_________________________
Web site: www.MyLittleGremlin.com

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#103859 - 05/19/06 06:13 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
sugarglidersuz Offline
Glideritis Anonymous

Registered: 08/28/04
Posts: 14788
Loc: Cleveland, Ohio
I think Judie's experience is very interesting... it does confirm the fact that "common" bacteria, such as Salmonella can be deadly. For years, we've been hearing about how we need to be careful about eating raw eggs or in handling chicken due to the risk of Salmonella. Since all of Judie's gliders were Salmonella-free, I don't think that glider gatherings should be limited to eating out... Again, common sense applies & most food, once cooked & prepared is safe. I do believe that some common sense precautions about care & hygiene should be taken, such as washing hands before & after handling animals of any type. I also believe that since our gliders are our pets, it is not practical to treat our homes as labs...
Just my opinion...
_________________________
Suz Enyedy
:bb: Carina & Coobah
Allira & Gizmo :grey:
:grey: Picasso, Trinity Joy & Luna
:rbridge: DaisyMae; Darwin; Mareki; Mambo; Pika; Cricky; Reggie & Bobo, Pepe & Bittah


Suz' Sugar Gliders

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#103860 - 05/19/06 06:57 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


seems to me human to human transfer of illness is MUCH more likely than suggie to human but we don't even think about that in every day life. If the suggies are clean and well cared for I wouldn't think the risk of illness transfer is something to be concerned about.

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#103861 - 05/19/06 06:59 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Chris, trying to keep animals in such a sanitary environment is what suppresses their immune system in the first place. Animals and People need mild exposure to viruses and bacteria to build up an immunity. Trying to keep animals in a sterile state is, firstly, impossible, and secondly, not good for their long term health. A breeder doing so, would be like a parent sending a child into the world with out their shots. They may not get sick, but their risk of getting sick is much greater. Unless the breeder is planning on keeping all gliders produced at their facility and never selling a one of them, they need to somewhat prepare their babies for life outside their glider room... Now, I'm not saying that breeders should just let whomever in their glider room and not use common sense disease prevention, but seriously, having people dip their feet in bleach is a bit extreme. I personally ask people to use hand sanitizer when they handle my gliders and I just don't let any Tom, Dick, or Harry in... I try to protect my animals with out sheltering them.

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#103862 - 05/19/06 10:19 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
SugarBlossoms Offline
Serious Glideritis

Registered: 02/23/06
Posts: 5830
Loc: USA
Thank you very much Judie. The not knowing is the scariest. I can see how salmonella could happen and that is one of the things I am very careful about. I always have been well before having the gliders. That's awful that that incident happened, however, it was not your fault. From what I've always read, you are one of THE best breeders there is!
_________________________
Keeper of Handprints on my Heart, You left your Footprints on my soul.
My precious loves that left to quickly, Peanut, Katie
Isabella, Kiwi, Bonnie and Monroe.

Spread your wings and glide free of pain,
Until the day I see you again.

God speed my precious angels. I love you. Mama.

Top
#103863 - 05/19/06 11:07 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


As to respect of my work. We raise, in the lab, animals in a sterile environment and all the equipment and procedures we do is not to protect us from the animals but to protect the animals from us. We can be carriers of disease. We do not infect animals at my work we breed them then ship them to the scientists.

Now back to sugar gliders. My original example of the person who died had died from contact with another animal that was NOT a sugar glider and it was salmonella. As Judie stated earlier there is evidence that sugar gliders are carriers of this, as well as other diseases. My issue is with people going into and out of the breeder room. I donít isolate my animals in a lab, however I do not let people into my animal room unless it is a vet or an inspector. This is to limit the possibility of carrying in a disease. Also I am not totally eliminating the exposure to viruses and bacteria. I handle them, allow them to play in the room outside their cage and occasionally take them outside on person. This is different than allowing people in and out of your animal room. I know what my glider has touched and can limit its possible exposure. The shoes are a huge issue for me. If you step in dog [censored] outside from a sick dog or one with parasites and you walk into your animal room without removing your shoes you bring all that [censored] (literally) in along with all the round worms, heart worms, gerardia, ect... that that dog might have been exposed to. Walking on a lawn that someone might have fertilized if you track in one of the fertilizer pellets and your animal eats it what will happen? You do not need to isolate your animal in a lab setting but do not let people in and out freely unless they wash their hands, cover their feet and wear a mask. You should have these ready for use at your facility.

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#103864 - 05/19/06 11:45 AM Re: The importance of breeder room hygene [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


gee, I hate to make light of a situation, but this would make an obsessive compulsive persons' dream come true.

I understand both sides very much. I have done lab work, and in working on a commercial horse breeding facility, I understand the importance of dipping your feet. Sadly, I also realize that some things just aren't practical for some people. You can dip your feet, but the stall walls have spaces. You can separate feeding stations, but your using the same scoop...

I very much understand that exposure is not necessarly a bad thing. We HAD immunities to small pox, but now, they say if it is re-introduced to the US, it would be bad. Very bad.

Also, it's sad, but things happen. Sometimes, no matter what you do, the bomb drops. All you can do is be prepared for it, and do the best you can in the aftermath.

Obviously, it's wrong to be lax in cleanliness with any animal, human, or living quarters. You have to do what you can to be practical. Practical does not mean lazy. Excuses are just that. For some people, the options vary.

Do what you can for your animals, just as your pets or breeders do what they can for you.

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