Sugar Glider Community Calendar

Please click here to see larger view
Articles
More coming soon!!
Today's Birthdays
Shanel
Featured Member
Registered: 08/08/16
Posts: 7
Last 10 Posts
Twitchy tale movements
by FinFiFuFe
Today at 12:29 AM
Looking for vet recommendation, Atlanta
by Jen_faith
Yesterday at 11:54 PM
Fruits and Veggies
by Ladymagyver
Yesterday at 11:05 PM
Cold snap!
by Terry
Yesterday at 09:41 PM
Bedding
by Terry
Yesterday at 09:31 PM
First time glider owner looking for wisdom
by Terry
Yesterday at 09:21 PM
Little Roxie
by kidqwik
Yesterday at 08:01 PM
Is newspaper safe?
by Feather
Yesterday at 06:15 PM
Bringing Home Your Baby
by Terry
Yesterday at 01:26 PM
Something every breeder should know
by ValerieMichelle
Yesterday at 10:01 AM
Google+

Facebook
Join Us On Facebook
Topic Options
#50105 - 06/30/05 05:40 PM Protein Confusion?
Charlie H Offline
Glider Slave

Registered: 11/13/03
Posts: 1659
Loc: Wallis Texas
There seems to be a lot of confusion and misunderstanding about protein in the sugar glider diets. Many things should be taken into consideration. Most glider diets range around 18 to 20 percent protein. I know! You have read where the diet should be 25 to 50 percent protein. Re-read these recommendations. The 50% protein diet is usually stated that the diet should contain 50% protein SOURCE. For example if half of your gliders diet was chicken breast you would have a diet that was around 15% protein. If half of your glider diet was meal worms and crickets the diet would only be about 11% protein.

When you see the commercial glider diets advertised as having 40% crude protein. You need to realize what crude protein is. When broken down it is usually only around 13% usable protein. You also need to read all the ingredients to see where the protein comes from. You may be surprised to learn that the protein sources are by products of food processing plants. Things like chicken heads, feet, bones and even feathers. Same holds true with the scraps from processing beef, pork, and fish and even soy products.

Soo, if anyone tells you to feed your gliders a diet that is higher than 20% protein you should question how it is possible. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif" alt="" />
Charlie H
_________________________
Rescue & Rehabilation
http://www.angelfire.com/tx/glidertree/
[]glidertree@toast.net[/]

Top
#50106 - 06/30/05 09:49 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


protein is something that i am always worried about. i have my gliders on the the bml diet along with various fruits and veggies. i also feed meal worms, waxworms every once in a while, and until reading about that toxin that crickets carry i used to feed crickets. my question is...taking into consideration that i feed the bml diet how many large mealworms (not giant) should i be feeding a day? how many for a preg. female? also can i feed too many worms? what would the result of that be?


Edited by bestequalsme (06/30/05 09:54 PM)

Top
#50107 - 06/30/05 10:25 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


<img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/thanx.gif" alt="" /> for that tip, Charlie. It is very helpful. When I took Peepers and Jeepers in for their wellcheck, I proudly showed him my recipe for BML and my lists of fruit and veggies they like and don't like. He asked how many insects they get and I said about 6 each "Mighty Mealies" but not every day. Maybe every 2 or 3 days. He said to increase their insects, including as much variety as possible. We discussed backyard bugs like junebugs and grasshoppers to increase the variety and the pros and cons (concerns about insecticides from neighbors) of bug hunting. He also said it's a good thing to let some of the mealies become beetles and feed those because they have different nutritional qualities than the larval stage.

bestequalsme- It's my understanding that as long as crickets aren't fed contaminated food, aflatoxin isn't a problem. And I think cornmeal is the main problem. So if you could get them from a source that you know doesn't feed contaminated food to the crickets, it's okay to feed them to your gliders.

Charlie, your posts are very valuable to me. I really appreciate your comments. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/thumb.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

Top
#50108 - 06/30/05 11:19 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Badgersmommy Offline
Glider Slave

Registered: 04/30/05
Posts: 1382
Loc: Kentucky
I just read up some on this...the article I read also said that CORN can be a big problem...ummm..Badger loves corn (fresh off the cob) ...and crickets too (from a feeder supply) ...should I not give him corn anymore? ..and no crickets? geesh..I'm more confused now! <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif" alt="" />
_________________________
Glider Kids - Badger and Bonnie, Pepsi and Grace, Victoria.. ahem..I mean ummm..Victor! and Isabella <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

Top
#50109 - 06/30/05 11:51 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


other than crickets what other kind of insects would you reccomend?

Top
#50110 - 07/01/05 12:27 AM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Lucy Offline
Serious Glideritis

Registered: 02/14/01
Posts: 7354
Loc: Lexington, KY
Kudos, Charlie. I've watched for a long time now as the recommendations for protein have been creeping upward, and remember Dr. Dierenfeld's concerns that many glider owners might be feeding too much protein. This is an important post. I hope many read it.

Badgersmommy, this doesn't mean don't feed corn. Crickets are a protein source, but corn has a very minimal amount of protein.
_________________________


Top
#50111 - 07/01/05 01:03 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


<img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/thanx.gif" alt="" />Charlie <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/thanx.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/multi.gif" alt="" />
Very good info, I wasn't aware of it being detailed like that.... I feed about 50% protien source, but it never crossed my mind that that wasn't "50% protien"... very good point made!

Top
#50112 - 07/01/05 01:11 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Yes, corn and crickets are ok. The concern with these two items is the aflatoxins that mold on corn produce. The aflatoxins, from what I understand, can build up in the gliders system over time and eventually kill them. Thus the reason for getting crickets that are NOT fed on a corn type diet.

Thanks, Charlie, for the protein info. I hadn't realized that specification either.

Top
#50113 - 07/01/05 02:57 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Glidergurl89- As far as insects you can buy, you're pretty much limited to mealies, waxworms and crickets. That's why my vet was talking about gathering other kinds of bugs from nature. We talked about it at his office, and later I even emailed him an article written by Dr. C from Suncoast's website (turns out he knew Dr. C from a vet related trip to South America, I think) which was against bug hunting and we talked some more.

The use of "backyard bugs" is very controversial though, because of the concern that the bugs you get could have been exposed to insecticide which can harm the gliders. Personally, I don't usually use pesticides around my house but I live in a neighborhood where the houses are close enough together that my flying bugs could have visited neighbors' homes where they do use pesticides. I think grubs I dig up while gardening would be okay, because they don't travel to other yards. I have also fed a few junebugs to my gliders. Peepers got REALLY excited and I'd almost say loved them more than mealies. Jeepers wasn't really sure what to do with a junebug (these were little 1/2" or less sized ones). She actually took it, and was kinda like "what am I supposed to do with this, mom? You want me to EAT it?" then Peepers stole it. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/evil.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/roflmao.gif" alt="" />

In a couple years, we are moving to a place where we'll have a few acres (3 1/2 to be exact) so the neighbors are farther apart and I will feel more comfortable there. I definitely wouldn't feed anything like roaches, which are the main target of most pesticides. I figured junebugs don't crawl around the baseboards too much, and aren't a normal target of bug sprays, so I opted to try them. Grasshoppers are another option, but some non-organic gardeners may target them because they chew up the plants.

What do you think about backyard bugs, Charlie and anyone else who wants to comment? <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/nixweiss.gif" alt="" />

Top
#50114 - 07/01/05 03:03 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


My only fear about backyard bugs is the same as your, the pesticides....

Top
#50115 - 07/01/05 03:09 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Excellent information Charlie H. I feed my glider quite a few meal worms. I dont have a set number that they can eat. I just make sure that I dont ruin their dinner appetite.lol Like that will ever happen. As for the preg females, we let them have as many as they want and when they have the joeys oop and still feeding them, we still allow them as much as they want , since it takes alot out of them while they are going thru their preg. I dont feed crickets at all in any shape or form. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frostyangel.gif" alt="" />

Top
#50116 - 07/03/05 02:54 AM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: zookeeper18]
Anonymous
Unregistered


[:"blue"]Meal worms and all larvae (baby-stage insects) have more saturated fat than adults, which is a real cause for concern in gliders. There are 2 studies (I have the PDF's for anyone interested) that are my basis for saying so:
#1 shows that during gestation and nursing, excess fat can cause visual problems, through deposition in the liquid and/or membranes of the eyes. Excess fat can also build up around the organs of adult gliders, especially their livers, and be dangerous. BUT, you cannot just NOT feed insect, b/c #2 shows that not enough protein leads to cognitive difficulty in baby gliders, and we all know many other reasons why adult gliders should get protein, even when not reproductive; basically all the same reasons WE need protein. None of the proven diets have enough protein to sustain glider health, unless supplemented with insects (as recommeneded in the plans themselves).

I know choices for adult feeder insects can be limited in some areas, but I would strongly advise against the "just feed them lots of meal worms" approach, as this isn't without negative consequences (mentioned above). If you have no other options, keeping the meal worms out of the fridge until they metamorphose into beetles is a great alternative! Gliders really need to get some adult arthropods in their diet, especially since in the wild the eat MOSTLY moths and beetles, we should not be feeding only larvae.[/]

Top
#50117 - 07/03/05 05:58 AM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Charlie H Offline
Glider Slave

Registered: 11/13/03
Posts: 1659
Loc: Wallis Texas
I will have to disagree with you that gliders have to have or need insects in their diet. Boiled chicken has about a third more protein and less fat than mealworms. So why would the gliders need mealworms or any other insect. Gliders in the wild surely eat insects but they also eat other items that captive gliders are not fed. The diet for captive gliders is entirely different than the wild glider diet. Thousands of gliders have thrived for years in captivity on diets that do not include insects, acacia gum, bee pollen, or most of the other items they eat in their native wild diet.
Charlie H
_________________________
Rescue & Rehabilation
http://www.angelfire.com/tx/glidertree/
[]glidertree@toast.net[/]

Top
#50118 - 07/03/05 07:07 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


[:"blue"]So, how are you maintaining their teeth & gums? That's what the exoskeleton has been shown to do. And what about sodium? Needed for nervous system function, but not found in fruits, veg or BML and they can't handle raw NaCl...they get it from bugs in the wild...

If you cook their chicken you've changed the form of the protein to a less digestible form, and you've added carcinogens, but if you don't cook it you risk salmonella and other pathogens. Not to mention hormones, and antibiotics, which we, and our gliders, get from eating farmed chicken...not such a great alternative in my opinion. You've got their protein covered (they will eat birds and eggs in the wild, so this isn't "totally different" from wild diets) but perhaps you're not considering other factors?

While some captive diets may be different than wild, they're approximating the components as best they can. If you look at the zoo/university glider-keepers, their diets are as close as they can be within the limits of their resources, with appropriate substitutions made with fully researched and stated knowledge of the consequences, only when necessary. When we diverge from the diet it has taken millions of years of evolution for gliders to adapt to, well, this is why we have mysterious illness and sudden death.

And it's not just about nutritive value, there is a whole other dynamic of behavoral interaction and emotional/mental benefit from aspects of wild life recreated in captivity, like chewing gum/sucking sap, catching bugs and making leaves into nesting material. These are mentally important, beyond any purely digestive purpose, they make for HAPPIER, less bored creatures.

Just keeping gliders alive and breeding for years doesn't mean a diet is ideal. Zoos and universities have found over and over again that approximating the wild diet and environment gives the optimal results. This is THE paradigm in captive animal husbandry today, and the most successful of programs (like the San Diego Zoo) follow it. They don't just change things b/c it's easier, not if they want sustainable, healthy thriving populations.

In the dark ages of zoos they kept many animals alive for years, and some even breeding, on either dog kibble and raw hamburger, or straw and oat diets, while living in concrete boxes. This is a testament to the powerful will to live and survive, despite terrrible conditions, on the part of the animals, not evidence of proper husbandry. In any case hardly the model I want to base the care of my sugs on...[/]

Top
#50119 - 07/03/05 09:19 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Excellent post on behavioural enrichment in captive animals! <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/yelclap.gif" alt="" />

Here's a thread from awhile back where GC discussed protein needs of gliders (based on studies on wild gliders in Ian Humes' publication). Working out the math the daily requirment of a 124 g glider consuming approximately 50 g of food daily, we can calculate through ratios the amount of protein required daily using a formula previously presented by Pockets/Ian Humes, and it works out to a little over 0.1 g of protein daily (and that is the amount of pure glider-usable protein determined through nitrogenous concentrations in the feces). Just thought this thread may shed some light on the matter, also, as it relates to Charlie's first post!

In the past I've seen it posted that gliders need 15% protein in a diet, for instance, and it makes me somewhat nervous, because what they really mean is 15% protein source and there is much room for misinterpretation. The distinction means all the world of a difference, as figures like that (15% protein requirement) can be very misleading, and as Charlie pointed out, a concern.

http://www.sugarglider.net/ubbthreads/sh...true#Post384918

Also, at this point, I have not read any reference as to which exact amino acids gliders require (gotta contact good old Pockets again!), and I feel once we've isolated those specific amino acids, we may be able to have a better grasp as to what alternative protein sources may be best to use (for those who feel insects can be replaced with a substitute).

Mikey <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/dance.gif" alt="" />

Top
#50120 - 07/03/05 10:42 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


FlyingElvis- Your point about the larva stage having more saturated fat, etc. is exactly what my vet was pointing out when we got on the subject of what kinds of bugs to feed. He also suggested letting the mealies morph.

This is a really great thread. Thanks, Charlie for starting it and Elvis and Mikey thanks for your great contributions too. Keep it comin'! I'm learning a lot!

Top
#50121 - 07/03/05 11:06 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


It's a great concept, letting the mealies morph - I tried it. Monster will eat anything & did! LOL! Stewie does whatever Monster does! LOL again! But Zoe & Fawkes flat out refused! Then again, I can't get Fawkes to eat ANY bug! So, I have been alternating with scrambled/hard boiled eggs & yogurt. I have to agree with you though FlyingElvis - chicken scares me! Between the hormones, salmonella, and phosphorus content, it's just not an option for me. I'd much rather use home-farmed bugs & supplement with organic eggs & yogurt. Great thread!

Top
#50122 - 07/04/05 05:07 AM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Charlie H Offline
Glider Slave

Registered: 11/13/03
Posts: 1659
Loc: Wallis Texas
Mikey posted
"In the past I've seen it posted that gliders need 15% protein in a diet, for instance, and it makes me somewhat nervous, because what they really mean is 15% protein source and there is much room for misinterpretation"

I don't recall seeing a recommendation for a diet with a 15% protein source but one source does suggest a 50% protein source for a gliders diet. I would like to see the amino acid chain for protein requirements of sugar gliders. Not sure if it has ever been established.

As far as the exoskeleton of bugs cleaning a gliders teeth, that is a very skeptical statement. But there have been cases of chitin getting embedded in between gliders teeth and gums. And other cases of gliders getting choked on a piece of chitin. Pet gliders do not live in zoo like conditions. There is no comparison to the way we care for our pet gliders and the way zoos operate. And the captive glider diets have been researched and used for quiet a few years. Some of the zoo animals do better if items from their natural wild diet are incorporated into their daily diet. But this is not necessarily so for all animals. Most captive animals are healthier and live longer than they would in the wild. And diet is a major factor in this.

I used chicken as an example to compare protein percentages not as a suggested glider diet. Marla mentioned the dangers of feeding cooked chicken breasts. I seriously doubt there are as many dangers in feeding it as there are in a glider in the wild eating wild bird eggs, raw baby birds, lizards, and wild insects. All of these items are a high risk for salmonella and E coli. Not to mention the insecticides that the farmers and ranchers saturate the environment with. If you are looking to find a more complete protein source think about eggs. Even though the chicken egg is lower in protein than some other sources it is the most complete source of protein available.

But my main concern is not so much the source of protein but the amount in the gliders diet. It is all of the misleading statements that I mentioned in my original post. And remember that too much protein is just as bad as too little. One of the dangers of excessive protein is that it keeps the body from absorbing and utilizing calcium properly.

Marla asked "What about sodium?" Chicken breasts have sodium.
Check it out.

http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

Charlie H


Edited by Charlie H (07/04/05 06:07 AM)

Top
#50123 - 07/04/05 11:08 AM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Think variety! Not just for the psychological benefits, but because different protein sources have different trace elements. This is true for ALL foods. An ideal diet has moderate amounts of a wide variety.
My gliders enjoy duck eggs, duck and quail. Silkworms are another captive-bred feeder insect available on the web. In addition to offering them as caterpillars, keep them for awhile and they turn into big moths, which are apparently very tasty.
BTW, I've been feeding wild insects for years with no ill effects. Favorites include: drone honeybees, grasshoppers, June bugs, crane flies, and moths.
If you're certain there are no pesticides or chemical fertilizers, then the only thing you need to watch out for is parasites.

Top
#50124 - 07/04/05 06:57 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


</font><blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr />

I don't recall seeing a recommendation for a diet with a 15% protein source but one source does suggest a 50% protein source for a gliders diet...

<hr /></blockquote><font class="post">

Indeed, Charlie. Anything higher than 15% protein recommendation is just as startling, so I also share your concern!

Anyway, the post I was reffering to was one where Ian Humes himself had emailed a member on GC (I think it was ShaunG) stating that gliders require 15% protein in their diet, but he was refering to an approximation of a 15% protein source (arthropods, chicken, or what have you) not 15% mass crude protein. Dr. Humes then suggested to refer to his publication; as mentioned we had already worked out mathematically through a formula he provided, the value of the maintenance protein requirement of the average wild glider and it came out to 0.1 g of protein (as mentioned above).

Slightly <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/offtopic.gif" alt="" />: Initially, I felt this figure was rather small (the BML diet offers approximately 1.5 g of protein), however:

1) 0.5 g describes the total amount of useable protein (Petaurus breviceps' essential amino acids), i.e. of exact amino acids among the 20 possible ones. In other words, different protein sources provide different amino acids (amino acids are the building blocks of protein. There are different kinds of protein and each is determined through their chain of amino acids, and every animal absorbs a specific set of specific amino acids from their food; humans require 8 specific ones, for instance - isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tytrophan, and valine) and the 0.5 g describes protein amounts of the exact essential amino acids for gliders, not amount of generic protein.

2) the gliders refered to in Hume's study were wild samples, hence they were gliders that only bred seasonally, corresponding with variable protein intake available in their habitat during the breeding season; most captive gliders are allowed to breed year round, and so overall, captive gliders would require a greater amount of protein than the formulated 0.5 g.

Anyway, to get back on topic, I feel the list of glider's essential amino acids have been explored in the lab, and I'm almost positive Pockets has the reference material in her possession. Australia is no stranger to these marsupials. It's only a matter of getting our North American hands on the publications and studies!

So as I mentioned, once we know what exact amino acids gliders abosrb from their food, we can then isolate which non-arthropod protein sources may be more beneficial to our gliders over others. Until then, I (as in a personal choice)choose to incorporate arthropods (mealies, crickets, aphids, roaches, caterpillars/moths, etc) and young mammals in my gliders' diet, all live and unprocessed.

Mikey <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/dance.gif" alt="" />

Top
#50125 - 07/05/05 05:30 AM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Charlie H Offline
Glider Slave

Registered: 11/13/03
Posts: 1659
Loc: Wallis Texas
For those interested in glider diets we do need to know the gliders essential amino acid requirements. Would be interesting to also see which amino acids the glider is able to manufacture in its system.

Although I have seen breakdowns on insects for protein %, calcium, phosphorus, and fat I don't recall ever seeing a list of the amino acids provided by insects. Would also be interesting to see how much iron insects add to the diet. The study of a gliders diet in the wild should be taken into consideration when formulating a captive glider diet. But most wild animals feed according to the availability of food. Since food sources change seasonally it is not reasonable to consider most wild animals diets as the best diets for them. If a wild animal is hungry it is going to eat whatever is available. We see stories of wild gliders rummaging through peoples garbage. I am sure this is not considered a part of their natural diet but demonstrates the extent they will go to when hungry. Availability of a food source does not make it a healthy choice.

Back to the original topic. I feel glider owners need to understand the terminology used when it comes to choosing protein for their glider diets. Use of terms like crude protein and protein source has caused many to become totally confused. Glider owners need to understand what these terms mean.
Charlie H
_________________________
Rescue & Rehabilation
http://www.angelfire.com/tx/glidertree/
[]glidertree@toast.net[/]

Top
#50126 - 07/05/05 03:16 PM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


I'm not making a judgement call on one particular diet or another. But I would like to point out (for the benefit of gliders and humans) that organic chicken and chicken-based baby foods available (i.e., those that don't contain antibiotics or hormones). Also, you're not adding carcinogens to chicken by cooking it unless you're frying it or broiling/baking to the point of caramelization.

Top
#50127 - 07/06/05 06:40 AM Re: Protein Confusion? [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


[:"blue"]CharlieH, I think your original point about knowing what the terms mean is a great one, and I'm glad you brought it up. I don't disagree with you about it at all. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/thumb.gif" alt="" />

I posted in response to other comments, and so I am going to start a new thread to discuss the other ideas brought up in this thread, that aren't related to your protein Q, b/c I think they need to be discussed, but you're right, it's <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/offtopic.gif" alt="" /> for this one. I think natural conversations have a way of moving on to other dynamics, but I guess we just have to keep opening new threads for those subsequent ideas...

= "Wild vs. captive diets" is where I will post my thoughts about those other aspects, and open a dialog (I hope) with any of y'all that are interested.[/]

Top




Moderator:  Feather, KarenE, Ladymagyver, Philwojo 
Sugar Glider Help Page



Please click above to see how you can help!!

Moon
CURRENT MOON
Who's Online
0 registered (), 12 Guests and 56 Spiders online.
Key: Owner, Admin, Mod
Newest Members
Angelicat26, AbbyGlider, Klasha, Amanda159, aalissa
6385 Registered Users
Forum Stats
27 posts in the last 24hrs
6386 Members
134 Forums
8898 Topics
147871 Posts

Max Online: 478 @ 07/15/07 01:24 AM
Last 10 New Topics
Twitchy tale movements
by FinFiFuFe
Today at 12:29 AM
Looking for vet recommendation, Atlanta
by Jen_faith
Yesterday at 08:40 PM
Cold snap!
by Ladymagyver
Yesterday at 12:51 AM
Bringing Home Your Baby
by Amanda159
10/18/17 06:42 PM
Bedding
by Amanda159
10/18/17 05:53 PM
Male Glider penis problem
by Jen_faith
10/18/17 04:58 PM
Little Roxie
by kidqwik
10/17/17 06:57 PM
Is newspaper safe?
by Glamper
10/17/17 06:39 PM
Taking your glider to work
by Amanda159
10/17/17 05:08 PM
Fruits and Veggies
by Amanda159
10/17/17 05:06 PM
(Views)Popular Topics
I just found a lump on Timmy's chest--HELP! 20202961
Spencer needs your prayers/good thoughts 12464984
TEXAS 645533
Pitbull biter needs advice/help 588116
OHIO 504480
Member Titles 448480
MISSOURI 382692
HOLY CRACKERS AMERICAN HPW's 359254
OKLAHOMA 343718
URGENT - Genetic Flaw discovered 341712
Supported Browser
This site was tested and is best viewed in Google Chrome & Mozilla FireFox



Firefox 3

Download your copy today!!!


GliderCENTRAL
©1998-2017