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#5067 - 07/28/00 07:11 AM Print me for you or your vet,,,,,,,
Anonymous
Unregistered


Here you will find info that I put together hoping people can use it.

Information Posts from GliderCentral:

POCKETS
Glider Lover

From Caroline MacPherson's book "Sugar Gliders"
Possum or Opossum?

Contrary to popular belief, the terms possum and opossum are not interchangeable. To refer to an American opossum as a possum is to abbreviate its real name. To refer to an Australian possum as opossum is outdated and incorrect. The o has been dropped from the Australian possum's name in order to make a distinction between two very different groups of marsupials.
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Bourbon
Glider Lover

YES a glider can live alone fine, happy, and healthy... If a person, can not take the time to spend with their glider, whether 1 or 2, they need not own one.. As harsh as this sounds. It is the way I believe. If a person writes in and says their schedule is too busy for the glider any more, and asked if they should get another, the main response would be NO, if one is being neglected, then why add another to suffer with it. To own a lone glider is NOT detrimental to it's health and well being, to not spend time with it, is down right cruel. As Beck had said, the differences between the gliders in captivity and the gliders in the wild are immense. I see that the gliders I find homes for , are with people that are willing to spends lots of time with them. The sad fact is too many breeders out there, don't care whether their gliders end up in a cage for thew rest of their lives. A glider is very much like a child, but that goes with the only child debate as well. For there is no difference.. I have seen many a lone children, grow up to be very successful adults, the time you spend with a lone glider is important. but the time that is spent with 2 is also important. Too many times I have read about how 2 gliders are much happier than 1, usually by the same people. I my self have both in our home, my daughter has a lone glider, she spends loads of time with her, she is perfectly happy as being alone. I had mine for 6 months as a lone glider, she still after having her mate doesn't care whether he is there or not. I have seen MANY gliders that resent having another glider in their home. not that they don't like their new playmate, but they also loose a lot of what they had become accustomed to. I don't push the issues of having mates for gliders. you tell people all the time, about me and my bonding.. I have had to deal with many owners that go out and get 2 gliders, and can't bond, or people who have bonded with 1 and got them a friend, now they no longer have that bond, people that have a lone glider that can't find it a playmate because their glider only wants to be the #1. I would NEVER suggest anyone getting a second glider, because they don't have the time for the one they have.

The average glider owner as you have put it, buys their gliders without knowing too much about them, without knowing the basics many times, but also their unique needs. I personally think there should be long processes required before a purchase, and I for one, abide by that, I make sure that someone has the love in them to see life through their gliders eyes, to feel what they may be feeling. I knew when Beck got her glider, that she would make a wonderful glider owner, and she has not disappointed me in the least. I used to spend many hours a day with mine, (up to 20) and then life took it's toll on me. I too am very very busy, but I do not have cage gliders, I do not count on the cage mate to spend my time with her, she would never stand for that. My life is busy, but I MAKE the time for my kids and my gliders, and they are both wonderful. I don't spend near the time with her that I used to , but when I can, I do spend as much as I can. the minumum of 3 hours a day..If you watch 2 gliders playing together through the night, you will see that short of just being sure the other is near, there isn't too much that they do together, much like 2 kids on a playground. one plays with one thing while another plays with another. It isn't like they pick up a ball and play catch with each other.. especially if you have both a male and a female, the male is usually the one doing the chasing (unless the female is the dominat one).. Mine although is paired up now, when out to play, spends their time interacting with us. I take many a trip, and I take mine, leave the cage mate behind (with hubby, his person) they are both perfectly fine with that. I have seen Many more gliders that live alone perfectly happy with just their owner. And actually perfer it that way, than gliders that were in pairs. It does depend on the owners. those in pairs are harder to bond with, it does take much much longer to bond with 2. Many times the bond with one is needed. look at how many people get second gliders and really look at WHY they feel a second is needed.. in all a glider is usually only awake for a total of 4 to 5 hours, usually from 2 to 6 in the am, to spend 2 hours PLAYING with them, is NOT an unjust time frame.

Look at how few hours a parent ACTUALLY spend playing with their kids each day. An average day for a kid.. they get up at 7 off to school at 8.. that is one hour (not playing), they go to school, come home about 4, do their homework till 6, eat till 7 by about 9 they are in bed. whether the parents work or not.. so according to the "norm" the parents only SEE their kids, 6 hours a day, only of that MAY spend an hour playing with them..now lets look at an average day for a glider..if a person carries their glider, lets say after work, at 5, from 5 till lets say 9, then they feed them, wake them to play about 11:00 play with them till about 1:00 that means as a minumum, they have already spent, 6 hours with them, now lets say you have a busy life, you glider is not bonded enough to carry, then the playtime alone of 2 or 3 hours is already half of their wake time.. that is more than the average parent spends with their spouse, let alone their kids..I do not push the 2 or more gliders, if a person doesn't have the time for one, then find it a home that will MAKE the time for it..If someone gets a second glider, because it found a playmate that it WANTS to be with, then by all means go for it. As in Fuzzy and Precious, who were playmates that fell in love. Or playmates that really want to be together, not because the owners are afraid of not being able to spend the time anymore, or because they THINK they may be lonely.. What would you do if you had an only child and no possibility of having another? Of course, you would spend time with it..This is something people should really consider BEFORE getting a glider, the time spent is vital...
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Cynthia
Moderator

I had to trim the nails of a new glider that was obtained after I got home from the hospital. Heads up guys! One of the nails on her back foot had grown completely around and into the fur! I could not get the nail between the blades of the clippers! I had to clip it with the edge of the clippers then pull it out of her fur. To clip a gliders nails safely place the glider into a pouch in the middle of the day. Pull one leg out of the pouch and place the nail to be clipped between the blades of the clippers and pull the nail along the bottom blade of the clippers until it hangs or gets snagged on it. That is where you clip the nail. You just want to take off the very tip. Do this with each nail on that foot, one nail at a time. Open the pouch and let your glider pull that leg back into the pouch and give it a treat to eat. While your glider is munching on that treat pull out the other leg and repeat the procedure. This way you will not clip them too close and let blood. If for some reason you do clip into a vein you can treat it with a steptic pencil or pack it with baking soda. I have taught several vets to trim a gliders nails using this technique.

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whammy
Glider Lover

I have found a slightly different way to trim their nails because after I got my second glider the pouch or pocket method wasn't an option. I learned it from my vet actually. This process however, involves two people for the ease and saftey of the glider. One person takes the glider out of the pouch and hold them while the other cuts the nail being careful not to cut the vein. The trick is how you hold them...place a towel in your palm and then pick up your glider so that their back is in your palm and feet are up and then carefully hope them there paying close attention not to squeeze no matter how much they wiggle. The first couple of times that I did this with my gliders I got a lot of fight, but now even my not so nicely tame glider doesn't mind. And then of course you finish with a treat!!!!
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Cynthia
Moderator

Sugar gliders are marsupials. Marsupials go through a reproductive phase known as embryionic diapause. This is where the female gives birth, the young go into the pouch and the female will then re-breed the day of or the day after giving birth. That next embryo will then go into a state of stasis until the mother is no longer nursing and that is when it begins it's gestation. Then the cycle repeats itself. The fact that your female waited until after it had stopped nursing to try to re-breed is actually a delay in this cycle.
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April022
Glider Lover

I am still new to gliders but I think they lose or reject their first baby because they do not know how to take care of them yet. Same as cats with kittens-or so I've heard.
Love April, Giz and Shai

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John Derek
Glider Lover

April is right. They just don't know what to do. Plus they have alot of stress the first time. As do people. This plays a big role too.
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John Derek
Glider Lover

Here are two quotes from a page I found.

"Sugar gliders can live in forests of all types, given that there is an adequate food supply. They build their nests in the branches of eucalyptus trees inside their territory. "

"The territory size of a group of sugar gliders is around 2.5 acres."

This tells me there are 20-30 trees at least for a group of gliders in the wild. Therefore this also tells me if need be a female can hid or run from other females. In a cage if this need be there are no chances of a glider hiding or running. This is why gliders can breed in more then pairs in the wild, and why they can not in capt. IN MOST CASES. I always feel the need to try and expain WHY gliders can't breed in trios.
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John Derek
Glider Lover

I do not think alot of people realize that HLP is not something they are born with. They get it from the owner or the owner before. Someone in the gliders past gave it to them by not feeding them right. It is caused by lack of Cal. which we the owner provide. This is why Crickets, Tofu, and MOST veggs. are recomended in any advise I give about diet. In most diets these are inportant as are the levels of protein in a gliders diet.

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Cynthia
Moderator

A glider that has had HLP may also have osteoporposis due to the decreased amount of calcium that they had to get the HLP. That is going to mean weak bones on her part and lots of extra TLC.
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John Derek
Glider Lover

Well here are a few things I have heard about color.It can change with diet, age, color itself, and I have also heard it depends WHERE THEY CAME FROM. ????? I do not know but for ex. grey are from Aus. as the other from another reagion. I forget who posted this but it was posted at one time. HOPE I HELPED.

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Bourbon
Glider Lover

John.. as for the grey being from Australia, that is not necessarily true, a few years back we were all working on what we called "tribes" and with that which could account for some gliders not getting along.. you see, like many different indian tribes that all live in the same state.. they have their differences.. for example..

1.size, some gliders are smaller than others, some are "sumo" gliders..
2.Tail lengths- some gliders have long thinner tails, whereas some are shorter and bushyier
3. Facial structures- some have round faces , some have sharper features, some are tiny and petite(mouse like).
4. Stripes in Australia they only have the one stripe down the center, the ones common here also have the two that run beside their eyes. then you have the broadness of the stripes..
5. colors.. this one is also very varied.. a.you have the colors of their underbelly, some being white, others being more of a creamy colored (marking/urine stains not to be included) b. the color of their stripes, some are brown, grey, and black c. the color of their body. As in humans hair, some are constant, others change with the seasons, my daughters hair is like that, several different colors depending on the season. those colors can range from the Albino (white) to the mahagony (RED)

Through the cross breeding of the "tribes" you have so many more possibilities now, you may have a glider whose immediate parents look alike, but through the linage it may have been very different..

Hope this helped some...

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POCKETS
Glider Lover

Bourbon, I understand that alot of 's from Australia have white tips that vary in length on the tips of their tails.

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Bourbon
Glider Lover

actually Pockets, the white tips have been found to be a lack of a certain mineral that is found in carrot, and the juice.. it is said that the gliders that have the white tips on their tail gets cataracts, that by giving the carrot juice as a regular thing that it, prevents this from happening.. Now I know this is old info, and whether or not it is true, I don't know.. I haven't heard of any gliders in the last caouple of years being born like that.. so Maybe all the lines were cleared up? I don't know..
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Cynthia
Moderator

A glider will extend both of his penis' when he goes through the pubescent period, this usually occurs at 8 to 12 months. Your glider is about four months oop now, or almost nearly and he could be going through early puberty or he may have a problem. The swollen scrotal sac is what concerns me here and I firmly believe in taking my gliders to the vet if there is any question what so ever. SO I suppose what I am trying to say is that you may have nothing to worry about here but take him to the vet anyway and have him checked just to play it safe.

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Cynthia
Moderator

The males have two penis' and the females have three vaginas and two uteri. The males when they go through the puberty phase do become fastinated with themselves much as boys do. Some have even said that they saw their gliders apparently flossing their teeth with them, yeouch. At your gliders age he should be past that, is he mated? Is he neutered? There is a danger of them drying out and must be observed for this possibility. They can also give themselves UTI's by exposing themselves to bacteria. The major tip off to this is increase in water consumption.
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bounty1
Glider Lover

The scent gland on their head is not actually bald. Is simply slicked down because of the oils in the scent gland. Once a male is neutered the scent will dry up and the fur will stand up again.
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Cynthia
Moderator

By the time that the glider is weaned it has all of its teeth. It is not teething. Gliders naturally scrape wood to get at the sweet tree sap, they also chew at wood to get to insects living in it. Try putting a manzanita branch in his cage. It is nearly petrified wood and will give him something to chew on and can be easily sanitized when you clean the cage accessories.
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Cynthia
Moderator

For years I have been warning people not to use socks as a pouch or in the nest because pulled threads can get wrapped around their limbs like a tourniquet and they have to have them amputated and in one case a glider got it's head and neck wrapped up in the string and the more that it twisted the tighter the threads got and the glider eventually killed itself. I turn a pair of my gliders loose in my room every night. For months they have enjoyed sneaking into my pillow even when I am laying on it. Well the lining is ripped on one of the pillows and the gliders love to snuggle down in that pillow. They have been doing that for months. The other night I had let Pumba and Timone loose in the room. They have two joeys just three weeks oop. The parent gliders were in my pillow. I don't know why I went in there again so soon after turning them loose but am thankful that I did. Pumba had gotten her head through some of the stuffing and had it twisted so tight that I had trouble getting the bandage sizzors between her neck and the string. I dared not use regular sharp pointed sizzors for fear that I cut her. She was still crabbing loudly and trying to attack me and who could blame her. She was terrified. After releasing her I held her and comforted her until she had calmed down then I placed her into her nest with her babies. That is all that it took to calm her. I have since put that pillow and case into another pillow case and if they try to get into that one, out in the trash it goes and I get a new one. No pillow no matter how comfortable is worth the lives of one of my gliders. So take heed folks. Even when you think that your room may be glider proofed there are always dangers and hazzards, things that could not only maim but also kill. Please watch the fabrics that are in use around your gliders.
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Cynthia
Moderator

A friend contacted me last night concerning one of her gliders. In the cage she had a pocket bed for them to sleep in and it hangs onto the cage with two small chains. Her male got his tail caught in one of the chains as he went to bed, probably twisted the pouch around while crawling into it and got his tail caught in one of the small chains. When she found him caught like that he was immobile and she thought that he was dead. Now keep in mind that she had checked on them just a couple of hours before finding him this way. Things like this can happen so quickly. He wasn't dead but he was very thirsty and went straight for the water once she got him loose. Part of the hair of his tail is gone and his tail may even be broken. He goes into the vets this morning. It appears that he has good blood flow to the end of the tail. The Warning--Don't use pocket beds or pouches that hang onto the cage with the small chains. This may have been a fluke, but if it can happen to one glider, it can happen to any of them. Many gliders lost parts of their tails in the exercise wheels that have spokes before we learned to advise using the hamster balls on the stand or the wodent wheels. I don't want to see that happen with these pocket beds or pouches with chains. Why take unnecessary risks?
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Cynthia
Moderator

Yes marsupials get a condition called lumpy jaw.
Lumpy jaw is also known as big jaw and to be technical Actinomycosis. It affects marsupials, horses, cattle, swine, and people too. It is caused by several species of bacteria of the genus Actinomyces, (fungus infection). The bacteria invade decayed teeth, diseased tonsils, soft tissues of the mouth. It is characterzed by abscessed, swollen and lumpy tissues of the jaw. The lungs and intestinal tract may also become infected. Usual treatment is to drain the infected area the give large doses of penicillin or tetracycline.
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New Member

LOOKS LIKE AN INCH OF HIS INTESTINES ARE HANGING OUT. DOESN'T SEEM TO BE IN PAIN. IM NOT SURE WHAT TO DO.

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Cynthia
Moderator

If it looks like red thin worms, or thin red string, it is his penis or penises. He can have them out for hours at a time you just try to make sure that they do not dry out and that he does not give himself a UTI. The male glider when going through puberty has been known to extend them up to two inches and even sit back a floss their teeth with them. If it does not appear like this take him to a vet asap. If it does and he is maturing it is just one more fact of life.
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Stephanie
New Member

I'd like to get my Gliders neutered~ which age would be best to do this, they are babies now, and I know to not do it soon...but I was just wondering...

POCKETS
Glider Lover

Our vet said - around 6 months

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Laura Ann
Glider Lover

Pockets, I think SugarLove's vet reccommends 6 months old, please correct me if I am wrong. Our vet reccomends for the babies to be 3/4 the size of a adult female glider. The younger male (13 weeks OOP) seemed to heal up in just a few days! It took Joey a little over a week to heal. Both with no problems.

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SugarLove
Moderator

Yes, the vet that my gliders normally go to recommends 6 months or older for neutering. this has given them plenty of time for their "stuff" to drop and also they are a better size to handle being put under for the procedure.
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Cynthia
Moderator

I think that you should also be aware that gliders will spray like a skunk and it will smell like a skunk but only for a few moments before disapating, it doesn't cling like a skunk. The reason that I mention this is that many baby gliders experience fear and anxiety when they go to a new home so it is to be expected.
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Cynthia
Moderator

As for the HLP, since I have some experience here. It generally starts out looking as if they may have injured one of their back legs or foot. They just don't seem to be carrying it right. That progresses to the point, and sometimes very quickly, to where they do drag their back legs and do not move them at all. It is as though they are totally useless. If this is not treated promptly they will then begin to have seizures and die. So at the very first sign of a glider seeming to have injured a back foot or leg get that glider into a vet for a checkup and possible calcium injection.
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Cynthia
Moderator

Signs of HLP are from a slight favoring of one hind leg or foot to the complete dragging and non use of both hind legs. Lethargy does not usually enter into it. However lethargy is a signal that something is wrong, any change in behavior, appetite, or appearance should be taken seriously and your glider should be taken to a vet. These animals are very good at hiding illness until they are just too sick to hide it any more and then many times it is too late to treat them. Lethargy can be a sign of depression, hypoglycemia, and a vast array of serious illnesses. Please for the sake of your loved one if you notice any change in them, take them to a vet to be checked.
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Cynthia
Moderator

There is a high instance in gliders that are fed dairy products developing cataracts and blinding the babies. diets high in fat have been known to cause white eyes, or white spots in the eyes that are fat deposits known as white eyes. The glider does not have to be fat, just be fed some foods that are high in fat such as peanuts and waxworms.
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SugarLove
Moderator

Here are some things to look for or at:
: check eyes, make sure they are clear of any cataracts, white spots or discharge
: fur that is soft and clean and thick--(no bald patches of fur)
: properly formed stool (check the bottom of the cage the glider has been housed in for this)
: activity level (make sure no signs of impediment in movement)
: check the other gliders the breeder has also...see how well they are taken care of
: ask about diet (you should continue the gliders current diet and gradually switch or improve it if necessary
: ask the breeder to handle the glider first...if someone is going to get bit...might as well be the breeder.
: make sure to sex the glider to make sure you are really getting a male or female...(we had this problem with our first glider)
: make sure the "feet" are capable of grasping (if not it may be a sign of poor health)

Just a few things I can think of right off the top of my head. Also if you are unfamiliar with the breeder, I would ask for references ahead of time
Let us know how things go

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POCKETS
Glider Lover

You might also ask the breeder - If & when a fecal was preformed. Do they offer a health certificate with. breeders veterinarian's - name & number. The USDA paperwork.
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Cynthia
Moderator

Unfortunately this is just what it means. If you get a well handled baby you may never experience this. If you get a wild glider or a baby that has not been handled it will bite to the bone out of fear or in response to danger, after all look at how big your hand is in comparison to it's own size. Hand tamed, social babies are always worth the little extra that you pay for them. As for how long that glider may bite in that vicious way depends on the glider. One friend of mine said that it took 7 months of constant handling to tame hers. Others have managed to do so within weeks of adopting their gliders. Use all of the bonding techniques that you can find but the secret is to go slow. Don't pull away because then they learn that biting will make you go away. That is one lesson that you do not want to teach them.
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POCKETS
Glider Lover

An inverted pouch or herniated pouch & the actual cause is unknown. Manually inverting the pouch back,can be preformed by a qualified vet, but sometimes it will repair itself. See a veterinarian because possibility of infection is high & proper antibiotics should be administered to avoid infections.
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Cynthia
Moderator

Gliders generally do well in temps between 60 and 90 degrees F. It is the inconsistency in temps that generally cause the problems. They need their environment to be consistant.
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Cynthia
Moderator

The battle cry is like a crabbing or fussing type of sound but it is slower and deeper and sounds much meaner than that. It is a sound of warning and I hope that you never do hear it. I only hear it from my Alpha males and Alpha females.
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Valkyrie
Glider Lover

Just a word of warning here... gliders do not hibernate the same way a bear does. If the temperature gets too cold, they will get hypothermia and if not treated in time, can die. A friend of mine's glider died of hypothermia when the power went out and the house got too cold.
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Anonymous

Well she's not barking all night long but sometimes it's pretty bad and wakes me up.

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MARY
Glider Lover

Unforunately there is not much you can do. You can try to put a light on when she barks, or get up and play with her for a few minutes and hope she stops then.
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Cynthia
Moderator

It could be a sign of lonliness, it could be her way of calling out to see if there are other gliders within ear shot. It could be that she wants your attention. It could be that she has seen a shadow move and is calling out a warning. It could be any number of things. However I always say that if your glider shows a change in appetite, activity level, or in behavior, get that glider to a vet. One lady thought that her glider was lonely and within a days time it was dead. It had been ill and she just didn't know it. Gliders hide their illnesses so well until they are just too sick or too weak to do so anylonger, then it is usually too late for treatment. Please, since this is a change in behavior for her, take her to a vet to be checked. The peace of mind would be worth the trip.
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Erik
Glider Lover

PLEASE, If you use sandpaper on glider toys to grind down their nails, DO NOT USE ALUMINUM OXIDE SANDPAPER. THE adhesives used In it are toxic to gliders. This type of paper normally looks whiteish or blueish, but check on the package.
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POCKETS
Glider Lover

From book - "Animal Rescue" by Ken White & his wife Joy (Tasmania) Cats or rather cats' droppings, are the bane of marsupials. This is a parasitic disease called toxoplasmosis. In most cases it's fatal with no obvious signs that the animal has been suffering. Do not let cat feces contaminate feed dishes or other areas the marsupial is allowed to roam. Even bedding used by a cat shouldn't be placed near the animal.
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Posted

i have read it before but i forgot one night to close the lid on the toilet.....the next morning my little stud was drowned. if you have a glider that frequently runs around free in the house, put up a post-it note for youself to remember to shut the lid on the toilet. one other thing that i had happen to my baby girl glider was the fly strip. she jumped right onto it and lost a bunch of hair and ripped her little ear. my best advice is dont use them becuase even if you are just holding your glider, it can get away and they tend to be attracted to the fly strip.
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Cynthia
Moderator

Barking can be a call for attention, or a warning that something is amiss. Gliders will bark for many reasons. When one of my giders barks they all get perfectly still as to avoid detection from possible preditors. I think that my gliders post a sentry to warn the others and myself that something isn't just right. Kind of like the merecats will do. Rocky is so happy with his new mate that he will sit in his pouch with her and just chirp and clickedy clicking to his hearts content. I love the many sounds that they will make. They are very vocal, so enjoy!
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Cynthia
Moderator

Glider babies are similar to human babies in this manner. Just as parents wait for the night when their baby will sleep thru the entire night so it is with gliders as we wonder when they will sleep thru the day. Consistancy is important and as they grow they will take longer naps during the day and shorter ones at night.
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Spatch
Glider Lover

Hi! Ok, I know before I told all of ya that Chaz's tail seemed shorter and it didn't have any black on the tip well that wuz when I first got him in March, and its still like that! But I thought it'd turn black but it didn't. I'm going to email the breeder I got him from and ask if anything had happened to his tail when he wuz a baby.

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Cynthia
Moderator

Feel the tip of Chaz's tail, does it feel knotted or come to a smooth tip? If it feels like it has a small knot on the tip of it then something has taken off the tip of his tail, if it comes to a smooth tip then you could pretty safely say that it is a natural length.
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Edited by sugarlope (09/13/12 11:26 AM)
Edit Reason: separated posts so it is easier to read

Top
#5068 - 07/28/00 07:13 AM Re: Print me for you or your vet,,,,,,, [Re: ]
Anonymous
Unregistered


Information Posts from GliderCentral Part 2:

Rachel2
Glider Lover

Because sugar gliders are warm-blooded, they don't need a heat source. Room temperature is fine for gliders without having to suppliment them with heat rocks or heat bulbs. Give them a blanket to snuggle in and that is enough. Heat rocks really aren't safe for reptiles. The rocks can get surges and get too hot and burn the reptile. If it isn't safe for reptiles then it definately isn't safe for gliders.
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Posted

My poor Mocha she looks really sick! I can see that it is because she is constipated! I dont know what to do! She needs help! She wont drink or eat! What can I do to help her! She looks like shes in pain! Please Help!

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Cynthia
Moderator

You need to get some apples or apple juice into her, see if she will eat a raisin or a small amt. of prune or prune juice. If you can't get anything at all into her she may be impacted or have an obstructed bowel and need to be taken to an emergency vet.

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POCKETS
Glider Lover

I am worried that she is also dehydrated have you tried sugar water? This is from Todd Bacon's book "Sugar Gliders"

"To help treat dehydration you should fix a mixture of sugar and water at 1 teaspoon of sugar to 1 ounce of water & feed a few drops of this to them through an eye dropper. The sugar is used to help speed the re-hydration. Feed immediately & wait 5-10 minutes & try a second time.Repeat once every hour until the sugar glider starts to act normal again".
------------------

Cynthia
Moderator

Neutering is the removal of the testicles. This can be done at any age after the testicles have decended down into the scrotal sac. Skunking is done out of fear. The glider from newly oop to old age, releases a scent like that of a skunk as a way of protecting itself. A neutered male may still mark it's territory with any of it's scent glands, just not as much or as often.
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POCKETS
Glider Lover

Sugar gliders also use several different types of Acacia trees.

"The presence of acacias capable of producing gum seems to be of great importance, at least to the southern populations". (Acacia dealbata) (Acacia mabellae) (Acacia irrorata) (Acacia trachyphloia) If you need any info just let me know as several of these books go into detail.
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Cynthia
Moderator

There is a difference between a social nip as a form of colony recognition, and the actual mean, blood letting, biting. Which is it that your glider is doing. I say ignore the social nip but discourage the mean, biting that they do out of defensiveness. As for the bonding, it took me two years to earn the trust of my wild caught gliders. It took only three weeks with a neglected rescue that friends of mine had rescued and they had her for 9 months without success with.
------------------

Cynthia
Moderator

One study by the state of Mich. University showed that cat food can cause intestinal blockages in gliders leading to death. I discussed this with my vet and was informed that not only are intestinal blockages a real possibility and concern but that it can also cause renal (kidney) damage and disease as well. I suggest for the health of your glider that you avoid giving them cat food of any kind. I mean why take chances??
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Cynthia
Moderator

I tamed and socialized four wild caught gliders and I can tell you that it takes a lot of time and perseverence. You have to go slow and take baby steps when it comes to taming them. You use the same techniques as when bonding with a captive bred baby but go much slower.
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Posted

A friend of mine just got her glider back (last week) from the vet after a 3 day stay....her bonding pouch has a zipper on it....and somehow the glider got his tail in it, and when she tried to open it, it just mutilated his tail. If you have zippers on your pouches, I suggest you remove them and replace with velcro...you can get velcro strong enough to keep a glider in if necessary. I wouldn't want to see anyone's glider suffer this way. He can't glide or even balance now and the vet says it is not likely he will regain his balance. Granted this won't happen to everyone, but do you want to risk being that one? Don't take the chance, it isn't that much work to fix it.
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Beth
Glider Lover

i'm thinking about putting a hibiscus in my room for them what do you think?

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POCKETS
Glider Lover

Beth, Wellness UCDAVIS web-site shows hibiscus<BR>to be -Non toxic, but also states the following -
"There have been specific cases where animals have been poisoned by plants considered safe to humans. Also keep in mind that animals tend to eat larger amounts of plant materials than humans and that may account for the problems seen in many animals".

Southern Exotics web page shows it as glider safe. But I have an Australian book called -"Caring For Possums" by Barbara Smith (1995) That states the following -Garden plants whose leaves or fruit are known to be toxic include the hibiscus...

Beth she does not say which hibiscus as there are over 200 species, but I would only offer your glider's the hibiscus flowers NOT the whole hibiscus plant - just to be safe! (I do give my glider's hibiscus flowers)
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Posted

I have 2 females--5 months oop and 1 year old. Lately, they seem to be crabbing and squawking at each other and seem to be grabbing each other when they are in the cage. This seems to happen around 11:30pm and last night I thought I would let them out and run off some energy but even that didn't work. The weird part of this is that at some point in the late evening or early morning, they wind up together in the nestbox. I want to be sure that they're not angry at each other.

-

Cynthia
Moderator

It sounds as if they are trying to work out amoungst themselves which one will be the dominant female of the two. Please be wary I have read where two sisters that had been caged together since being weaned got into a big fight one night. They were only three months oop. One was killed while the other was left badly mutilated. No one was able to determine exactly why they fought to begin with.

-

Posted
So, is this a normal same sex thing?

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Cynthia
Moderator

The dominance thing is normal, fighting to the death is not. I know one lady that has had a pair of females for years now and last year introduced a neutered male to them. The three of them now get along well. I mentioned the other case scenerio so that all could be aware of what could happen. In the wild the dominant gliders will run off the unacceptable gliders and their territory can span for miles. We greatly reduce their territory when we cage them therefore making them even more aggressive towards other same sex gliders. At best a same sex pair can become inseperatable, at worst one may kill the other. I simply say be aware and be cautious.
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Posted

I am going to get a glider soon and I want to know how can you tell if it is healthy?

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POCKETS
Glider Lover

AVI-RAVE,
Bright eyes
Moist pink nose
Pink gums & mucus membranes
Ability to grip with all four feet
Clear ear canals
Smooth fur coat
Good elasticity of gliding membrane

This is from EXOTIC DVM (care sheets)

-

Cynthia
Moderator

The best way is to get a health certificate on the animal in question. Some things to look for are bright eyes, active, ensure that there is no drainage from the eyes, nose, or mouth. Such as mucous from coughing. Ease of breathing. No loose or dried stool material around base of tail indicating loose stools. Not just the ability to grip with all four feet but exhibiting strength in all four limbs as well. These things will still not guarentee that the animal has no parasites or illness since gliders can hide any sign of illness until they are just too weak or sick to hide them any more. The best way to ensure that you are getting a healthy animal is to ask for a health certificate or a health guarentee.
------------------

Posted

A big Q is what is better, Males or Females.

-

mite
Glider Lover

Male Pros- Playful, friendly, calm
Female Pros- Pretty, gentle, more likely to stay on you

Male Cons- Rambunctious, bitey, smelly, stained, scent marking
Female Cons- Jittery, less confinable, faster, smarter

I prefer males. Neutering helps with the aggressiveness, scent marking and the bald spot. Opinions?

-

Kim
Glider Lover

Here's my opinions from my experiences. In defense of the female SG's :
I always thought I liked the males better too until I bonded with my female. It took 3 mos. but, it was well worth it. After she birthed that joey in my hands she became the sweetest one I have. Not that my males aren't sweet too because they both are.

Pros- Males
Playful- As in with humans or other gliders? For with humans it's a tough choice, Cherie and Salem are both very playful. Jerry really isn't all that playful. As in with other gliders they're all very playful.
Friendly- I don't notice a difference there, all of mine are face lickers.
Calm- I agree with you on that one. I think my males are calmer than my female(at night anyway).

Pros- Females
Pretty- I think the males are just as cute. No difference there.
Gentle- I agree with you on that one too except 1 thing. At hunting bugs Cherie is anything but gentle. She's a very big hunter, very quick.
More likely to stay on you- I have to agree with that one. Cherie stays with me more than my boys do.

Cons- Males
Rambunctious- Agreed
Bitey- I don't notice a difference, I don't have biters. I rarely get bit.
Smelly- Agreed
Stained- Agreed to a point, Cherie is slightly stained now too and I know it's not from dirty glider blankets in the nest.
Scent Marking- Agreed to a point, Males are definetly worse, but when she wants, Cherie can scent too.

Cons- Females
Jittery- Agreed
Less Confinable- No difference
Faster- I always thought so too
Smarter- No difference, my boys are as intelligent as my girl.

Well, I think that about does it. Did I get them all?

-

Jane
Glider Lover

I find that gliders vary by their own personality and apart from the scent gland problem of males it is too easy to try to categorise by sex but it doesnt work. I have seen shy males, shy females, males taht stick on you, females that just just want to be on you, hyperactive males, or females. The more gliders you see the more you realise that every glider is different and that you have to choose the glider you want and the sex of it is really irrelevant.

-

Bourbon
Glider Lover

In actuallity, I have notice in my four anyway that my female was the easiest to bond with, and she of all has the tightest bond. I believe more than whether she is a male or a female though, that alot of it, has to due with 1. time spent with her (I have spent the last 2 years with an average of 10 or more hours per day). 2. With the fact she was my first glider. I did a poll once and many people got a tighter bond with their first glider. I think that is due to the fact, that the first glider spends more one on one time with it's person, and get more attention. After getting a second glider the attention is then divided between the two, and it is more of an experimentation stage with the first. so spoiling is the prime directive. Much like first born children being closer to their mom. As for the males being calm.. well not in my home.. the males all act like adhd nerotic ones. Smokey (Alpha male) always has being the wirey one, can sit still for a minute without flipping off somewhere. Baybe (Alpha female) on the other hand is definitly a mommas girl.. where I am she is..she by far is the calmest, sweetest, most docile of the two..
------------------

Cynthia
Moderator

Baby gliders do sleep alot, they will nap during the day and night, with longer naps during the day and shorter ones at night. If s/he is active then more than likely s/he is okay but if you are still concerned then by all means take her to a vet to be checked it is always a good idea to have a new pet vet checked when you first adopt it anyway.
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carolyn cook
New Member

is it ok to bathe gliders
if so what do you use

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Leanne
Glider Lover

Gliders do a pretty good job of keeping clean on their own. If the glider gets too wet and cold, it can become sick. However, some people do occasionally bathe their gliders. I think they usually will use a warm washcloth or cotten balls. If you do bathe your glider, just make sure to dry him really well and keep him warm afterwards.

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Cynthia
Moderator

I would say not to bathe your glider unless it is absolutely necessary. I had to bathe one glider that got into a fly strip the sticky kind. I used the Johnson and Johnson baby shampoo and toweled her off well and kept her in the bosom of my dress till she was well dried. No fun for either of us.

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POCKETS
Glider Lover

I agree with Cynthia & would like to add - NEVER use a hair-dryer to dry a glider. Someone did this & it burned their glider's ears! (I believe it was it's ears)

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John Derek
Moderator

I never recommend bathing a glider unless they are so dirty they can't clean themselves and then I say just wipe them down.
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Bourbon
Moderator

I personally would never advocate a glider running free all night, without supervision. there is many reasons I feel this way..

-

John, in a recent post you talked about the gliders gliding and not always being "right on target" well that is true, the stories I have read about gliders running unsupervised outnumbers those injured and killed the illnesses.. Many owners have lost gliders and not known what has happened to them, broken legs, tails etc.. in kims case her glider got his toes wrapped up in a cord attached to one of their toys..it could have been much worse, it could have been his neck..Gliders when the door is opened can easily be behind, under or on the door. or worse on the frame..1 thing to always ask yourself,as they are much like toddlers.. in a child proof room, would you leave your toddler in there for about 8 hours without supervision? Of course not, too many things could happen..Gliders are no different...The best way to be sure your glider is safe, is to gliderproof and supervise.. there are many thing that can be a hazzard, and even more are being noted.. too bad that in order to get a complete list, sometimes a glider must die or get hurt..Please I beg of you, love your glider enough to supervise them...
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Cynthia
Moderator

I once heard a vet say that you should provide as big a cage as you can possibly afford for a sugar glider. The minimum should be no smaller than 18" X 18" X 24".
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Beck
Moderator

There are such things as glider leashes...an iguena leash would be far to big for them...however from the people who have used leashes very few have had good experiences. A few have..but most haven't. Its hard to get the gliders in the leashes.....also its hard to keep them in it once they are there. Most gliders hate it so much thet they will try desperatly to get out. It can deffinitly set the bonding process way back...lots of times they loose trust afetr this. Try pouch trainign your glider...and remember you have to trust youer glider ebfore your glider will trust you.
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Bourbon
Moderator

I have found giving them very very small pieces of what ever you try helps, what they snub one day they may eat up the next.. I also found that mine will only eat like one little piece of everything. As far as peaches , I couldn't get mine to eat them either. but I still offered.. 2 years later when I was about ready to reserve to the fact she wouldn't eat peaches, oranges, grapefruit.. she started.. i would take a tiny piece and she eats it now.. Mine will not eat banannas either. But she will eat the bananna pudding, freeze dried banannas and the banana juice with yougart baby juice. Try everything.. and don't give up.. Good Luck..
------------------

Emailed from Cynthia

Also Pricilla, this make noise and shake thing. What does that mean?

Hello John: That is the only time that you will hear the chitachitchit, chitachitchit sound coming from your female. She will make that sound and shake and jerk about is when she is talking to her babies and either encouraging them to go into or out of her pouch. It is common enough and that it most often when I know that they have one oop. Yes it is a good time to handle the babies when she leaves them in the nest. I handle mine from day one oop, 5 minutes the first time, and that is when I sex them as well. The males will have what appears to be a skin tag where the belly button should be and the girls a tiny slit of an opening for her pouch. From that day on I hold them for a few minutes more. By the time that they are weaned I have had them with me most of the day. Yes it will help with the bonding as she grows to trust you with her babies.
------------------

Posted

I noticed something odd w/ my male glider, Cam. His spot on his chest seems to have gotten larger and the skin looks as if the hair had been plucked out!!! It just looks weird. I checked the rest of his coat and it was fine, he is just as chipper as he always is, and he's eating fine (Toranga diet, fresh fruit, and brisky's). He was full grown when I rescued him from a breeder, but I'm guessing him to be about 2 years old. Can anyone tell me if this is nornal or not?

-

Cynthia
Moderator

For the scent gland to appear larger is normal for it to appear bald or rubbed raw is not. I would take him in to see a vet if you are the least bit concerned. As for the teeth there are only two reasons for a gliders teeth to become over grown, one is that there is a genetic birth defect. The vet can shave them down. The other is the diet. Accu-feed for sugar gliders is a complete diet and people that feed it and fruits and veggies without the added protein have caused liver disease in their gliders. To prevent an over growth in teeth you should feed only one proven diet and that alone.

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Beck
Moderator

Gliders are not rodents..their teeth do not get overgrown. Cynthia just told you what reasons they might...one being diet. By mixing their diets...even a few pellets a night can kill your gliders. The briskys is not soemthing to mix with all you are feeding. Please chose one diet...and do not worry about the teeth overgrowing.
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Posted

Is Millet OK for gliders?

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John Derek
Moderator

This is not good for gliders. It will block up the intestins ex. Stay away from small seed that will block up a glider
------------------

Posted

I've only had my glider for 2 days but still won't eat or drink
I have his food dishes on the opposite side of the cage as his sleeping pouch. I'm feeding him fresh fruits and vegies. I use a water bottle.I feed him at night. I know he is still scared but I'm still worried for him. he won't even exept the honey I offer him. What do I do???

-

Clara
Administrator

You might want to set out a dish of water or fruit juice in addition to the water bottle. Position it under or next to the water bottle. Move the food as close to him as possible. He's real scared right now and sure isn't going to go to the other side of the cage yet.
Try to keep it quite in the room he's in and turn off the lights at night except maybe a nightlight. Even tame gliders sometimes won't come out to eat unless the room is dark.
------------------

IrishCreme
New Member

It has come to my attention that there are many questions regarding the legalities of owning Sugar Gliders within Pennsylvania. As a licensed USDA breeder residing within the state of PA; this is how the laws were explained (as to be understood by myself) by my local USDA inspector. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
**The law itself reads -**
CHAPTER 137. - IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE
Sec. 137.1 - Importation, sale and release of certain wildlife. (a) Unless otherwise provided in this section or the act, it is unlawful for a person to import, possess, sell, offer for sale or release within this Commonwealth the following animals or birds or the eggs of the birds or a crossbreed or hybrid of the animals or birds which are similiar in appearance: (10) Game or wildlife held in captivity or captive bred in another state or nation.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sugar Gliders ARE considered wildlife. And therefore that simple fact places them easily within the regulation of the above law. The above law translates fairly easily into 'English' when read as a whole.
1. It is illegal to *import to, *export from or *release within the state of PA a sugar glider (wildlife).
In order to legally own a sugar glider within the state of Pa, it must be purchased within the state of Pa. That means no running to a neighboring state and bringing one home to Pa. - This is ILLEGAL. And if a resident of Pa is 'caught'... then PA Fish and Wildlife is in the position to take action against that individual. If you wish to bring a sugar glider into Pa from another state you must first petition Pa Fish and Wildlife for an import permit before any transportation takes place. The petition will be reviewed and approved or possibly denied by the department. (There is a fee for this permit) Legal ramifications can and usually are taken against any who break the Pa. import/export laws.

Also looking beyond Pennsylvania's state level laws - the USGovernment requires of any person selling a controlled exotic animal (which sugar gliders are) to maintain a USDA license and follow through with paperwork on them. This paperwork is MANDATORY to keep the license. It must include the breeders license # and their address for reference. Without proper paperwork for a glider, the "legality" question can easily be raised against any glider owner on a federal level also. This paperwork is what you MUST PROVIDE to Pa. Fish and Wildlife as proof that the glider was purchased legally from a USDA licensed breeder within the state of Pa.
One more thing to consider are your local ordinances. Does your city, township, or county have regulations regarding wildlife? if so, are sugar gliders within the boundaries of any of those ordinances?
There are many happy, healthy gliders and their owners within Pa... Sugar gliders ARE legal to own as pets in Pa... as long as you pay attention and follow the rules that have been set forth by Authorities...
------------------

Jane
Glider Lover

Just a quick note to remind you that peanuts are very fattening. Remember to give them only as rare treats. Some gliders do love them and will eat many and get real pudgy
------------------

andrea
Glider Lover

Here is some interesting data from my bible, The Exotic Medicine Library:
Sexing:
-The female has the typical marsupial bi-lobed uterus with a lateral vagina, central birth canal and developed pouch.
-Males have a midventral,fur-covered scrotum and a bifurcated penis with a preputial covering at the base of the tail.The pouch is absent.
-Males develop a scent gland on the forehead which they may rub on the female's chest.Males also have anal glands, and scent glands on the chest.
-Both sexes scent-mark territory.
-The female only marks with urine.Her scent glands are within the pouch.

Physical facts:
-Body length=16-21 cm/6.4-8.4 in
-Tail=16.5-21 cm/6.6-8.4 in
-Body weight:
Males=115-160g/4.1-5.7 oz
Females=90-130g/3.4-4.8 oz
-Body temp=89.6 F

Reproductive:
-Sexual maturity:
Males=12-14 mo
Females=8-12 mo
-Breeding season=throughout year
-Gestation period=16 days
-Pouch time=60-70 days
-Birth weight=190 mg
-Litter size=2-4
-Litters per year=2-3
-Pouch=4 teats
-Weaning= 8 to - weeks 2-4 mo
-Independent offspring=17 wks/4-5 mo
------------------

Cynthia
Moderator

The appearance of the bald spot simply means that he is entering puberty. He will begin marking his territory more frequently and become more assertive and territorial. Many gliders get their bald spot months before they are ready to breed but don't be surprised to see him exposing himself and preening in front of an intended mate or want to lay claim to every thing in sight including you. Males are generally ready for breeding at 12 to 15 months of age. I have one male that is nearly two years old that just had his first baby with his 9 month old mate. I have two other pairs that are a year and a 1/2 old that have not bred yet. One female had joeys in pouch when she was only 3 months oop herself. The first indication is generally the lumps in the pouch and many new glider owners don't even notice them until the babies are oop so just keep watching and like that watched pot one day it will boil.
------------------

Cynthia
Moderator

No no no no do not give cat food. It has been proven by a study done at Mich. State University that cat food causes intestinal blockages in gliders. Yes gliders need something to chew on, I recommend branches, my gliders have manzanita and grape vines. They need them to promote dental health, and to satisfy the urge to scrape bark to get sap. Marsupials teeth do not constantly grow as rodents teeth do yet they still feel the need the instinct to gnaw on wood. This is a survival instinct for them. Now as with any animal, there can be occasions where a tooth may become overgrown for some reason, but it is not because they naturally continue to grow. This is simply not true. It may have been believed to be true at one time. I think this is what Bourbon meant but can not speak for her. We really did not know much about gliders for years then did all the study and research that we could, did the best that we could and since then have changed the information available as false information was discovered. I don't doubt that you found it on a web site, but even the books that are out in print have some misinformation that we thought was good, but has since proven false. It is difficult to know which is which and that is why it is so good to have these boards so that we can easily exchange this information.
------------------

Hope this helps people. I always add to it too.

Help those who need your help. This goes for all the lil people too. And quote from a great and loving woman.(Cynthia Whiteshell may she live on forever in our gliders and hearts)

Pricilla, Damion, Mika, Nippers, Trixie, one oop joey, and John D. Gray
[This message has been edited by John Derek (edited 07-29-2000).]


Edited by sugarlope (09/13/12 11:53 AM)
Edit Reason: separated posts so it is easier to read

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